The Medicine Men & the Science

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Express News Service

With the fear of a third Covid-19 wave looming large, once again it is the healthcare professionals who will be affected as they battle the infection as well as their own physical and mental health. On the National Doctor’s Day today, we speak to those who will be in the thick of storm the third time over as to how they keep themselves balanced.

DR (PROF) AMITE PANKAJ AGGARWAL, DIRECTOR & HOD, ORTHOPEDICS & JOINT REPLACEMENT, FORTIS HOSPITAL SHALIMAR BAGH
Pandemic has definitely pushed us all to test our own limits. From the physical exhaustion of the inhuman PPE kits to the mental despair of handling unexpected deaths, it has been a much disturbing ride. I have started doing a lot of introspection. While many of my friends started yoga and meditation, I prefer physical activities like running and cycling, as these get my endorphins kicking.

DR SANDEEP NAYAR, SENIOR DIRECTOR AND HOD, CENTRE FOR CHEST AND RESPIRATORY DISEASE, BLK-MAX SUPER SPECIALITY HOSPITAL, NEW DELHI:
It has been a tough time for us. We need stress busters to keep us going. I love swimming but since all pools are closed, I do a bit of meditation and have picked up a few Yoga asanas. But one good thing is I am able to spend more time with my family as children’s colleges are closed and once back home from hospital, I keep inside. Interacting with children, playing some indoor games with them and discussions on various current events are great stress busters. I also connected with my school and college friends, and we now have online meets.

DR AASHISH CHAUDHRY, MANAGING DIRECTOR, AAKASH HEALTHCARE, DWARKA
To maintain a sound mind and remain unperturbed is the demand of the situation, especially when you are a decision maker of a healthcare organisation like me. The second wave was scary with the number of critical patients increasing every minute, and hospital running out of oxygen. There is no margin of error for doctors. I was always on the ground, working restlessly, keeping an eye on every activity and implementing the ideas on ground without delay. I performed yoga and meditation daily, which helped me to remain focused and positive.

DR BHUMESH TYAGI, SENIOR CONSULTANT, GENERAL MEDICINE, SHARDA HOSPITAL, GREATER NOIDA.
We are more vulnerable to negative mental health effects as we have to balance the duty of caring for the patients along with our own well-being and that of our family and friends. I engage in yoga and stay in touch with my family and friends as it boosts my mental health and brings a positive distraction from
stressful thoughts. I avoid watching news all the time, and limit the time I devote to social media.

DR VINAY BHAT, GENERAL PHYSICIAN, COLUMBIA ASIA HOSPITAL, GHAZIABAD
We face immense stress daily, which surely affects our mental health. To keep away depression, insomnia, and psychological distress, I take small breaks through the day and stroll inside the corridors to unwind. I also indulge in indoor exercises like yoga and running on the treadmill as it helps me improve my mood and sleep quality. I practice mind-calming exercises such as mindfulness and meditation. It keeps stress under check.

DR (COL) VIJAY DUTTA, SENIOR CONSULTANT, INTERNAL MEDICINE, INDIAN SPINAL INJURIES CENTRE
During the peak of the second wave, while we were staying at the hospital due to exceedingly high workload, I was in touch with my loved ones through digital platforms that helped me maintain peace
of mind. Also, being a doctor, I am able to screen and curtail misinformation spread in the media which prevents depression and anxiety to some extent.



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