“5 Divine Delicacies For Winter” Season That You Must Have

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We often like to indulge in a variety of treats during the winter season. This is also because our body slightly changes the way it functions. Due to the drop in the temperature outside, our metabolism changes and thus, the energy levels. That’s why, to keep our body healthy and strong, certain food items are highly advisable during this time of the year. Nutritionist Rujuta Diwekar has spoken about five food items that you must have in this nippy weather. Each and every food item that she mentioned carries a wide range of health benefits. She posted a picture of herself holding fresh amla and wrote a detailed caption.       

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According to Rujuta Diwekar, here are the top ‘5 divine delicacies’ for winter:

Sugarcane juice can help in improving body functions.

1.Sugarcane

For this, Rujuta stated that sugarcane is our oldest detox food, rejuvenates the liver and keeps the skin glowing in the winter sun.

2.Ber

This fruitstrengthens the immune system (great for kids, who fall sick frequently) and improves the diversity of our diet.

tamarind leaves imli patta herbs

Tamarind is good for winter

3.Chincha or Tamarind

Tamarind is a great digestive. Its seeds also make for a smashing drink when mixed with buttermilk.

4.Amla

Rujata has labelled it the “king of the winters”. It helps one in fighting infections. You can consume it simply or in the form of chyawanprash, sherbet or even a murabba.

5.Til Gul

A variety of sweets are prepared using til during winters. This is because til has essential fats and is great for bones and joints.

Take a look at Rujuta’s post:

Prior to this, Rujuta Diwekar shared ways to identify if your diet is a fad or fab. According to her, if you are eating only one food item and ignoring others, then you are on a fad diet. She added, “A fad diet plan often picks up one nutritional tip from your culture or traditional cuisine and amplifies it.”





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